"I have never welcomed the weakening of family ties by politics or pressure" - Nelson Mandela.
"He who travels for love finds a thousand miles no longer than one" - Japanese proverb.
"Everyone has the right to respect for his private and family life, his home and his correspondence." - Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights.
"When people's love is divided by law, it is the law that needs to change". -
David Cameron.

About Us

Who we are :

BritCits was formed in 2012 in direct response to the attack on British citizens and residents with non-EEA family members.

Immigration rules in the UK in force from 9th July 2012 make a mockery of family values and violate the sanctity of marriage in causing the separation of families, keeping our citizens in exile and forcing British children unnecessarily into a single-parent upbringing.

BritCits believes it is imperative that immigration rules are fair and clear, in both their intent and application.

BritCits is run by Sonel Mehta (founder) and Steve Green (partner) with a rapidly growing membership brought together by immigration rules which are leading to the break up of families of British citizens and residents with non-EEA family members whilst also forcing British citizens into exile.

Through BritCits, our campaigning activites include: policy work, liaising with media and information dissemination, with the goals of:

a) Promoting family rights for British citizens and residents with non-EEA family members

b) Having immigration rules in place which are fair, in both their intent and application.

c) Liaising with politicians from across the spectrum on impact of immigration rules on families.

d) Providing a support network for individuals affected by the rules.

e) Presenting at migrant events and working in conjunction with other organisations including JCWI, Northamptonshire Rights and Equality Council and Migrants Rights Network, as well as under the Divided Families umbrella and MAX coalition to raise awareness of the rules and their impact.




Website contributors

Steve is an engineer by day, a fearsome opponent of injustice by night. Long ago he did a degree in computer science. He's a former immigrant himself, having lived in exotic places like New Jersey. He came back to Britain because he likes it, and thinks it's worth fighting for.
http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/2013/08/steve-and-yuriko-success-story-you.html

Steve received a Special Recognition Award at the Sheila McKechnie Foundation's Campaigner of the Year ceremony, 2013 :
http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/2013/09/sheila-mckechnie-foundation-yesterday.html 

Sarah is the editorial head of a web content provider specialising in travel. When she is not busy producing content for major travel websites, she enjoys putting her master’s degree in Human Rights to good use by blogging and tweeting about issues surrounding migration and human rights.
 http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/2013/07/sarah-i-cant-believe-i-may-never-be.html

Christine describes herself as an 'eternal student, former politico and bar philosopher researching Middle East issues. Married to a Syrian. '
Christine's story is here : http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/ziad

David is a man of few words who lets his work do the speaking for him.
He is the creator of the acclaimed 'Surinder Singh for newbies', and the designer of much of the BritCits protest art. His professional website is here :
http://www.imaginationink.co.uk/

The Meetup Group organises events (both physical and virtual) around these issues, which run the spectrum from coffee dates to demonstrations and everything in between. Sign up here :
http://www.meetup.com/BritCits/

------

Things we've done :

The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Migration's report on the effects of family migration rules :
http://www.appgmigration.org.uk/family-inquiry

BritCits submission to the APPG Report :
http://www.scribd.com/doc/149254237/appg-britcits

Blog posts on the report :
http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/the-appg-report-is-out-httpwww.html
http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/the-appg-report-is-out-part-2-more.html
http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/2013/06/more-stories-and-excerpts-from-report.html

Posts on the 9th July 2013 Day of Action :
http://britcits.blogspot.co.uk/search/label/a%20very%20good%20day

On 9th July 2012, new immigration rules were introduced in the UK which affect a large number of British people with overseas family (spouses, children, and dependant parents). The rules will affect more and more people as time goes on. The rules were introduced by the 'back door' - first secondary legislation, and then (when the courts ruled against this - the 'Alvi' decision), emergency legislation was pushed through the House of Lords (as the Commons was in recess) without a proper debate.

We have collated a pack of case studies. We are in the process of reaching out to a number of interested parties with this pack, which is our contribution to the debate. Anyone with any stories to contribute, please email us :  
britcits@gmail.com  
steve@britcits.com

We will share some of these stories on this site.

The Rules.

In brief, the rules, state the following :-

Income
- Nobody earning less than £18,600 per annum can bring a partner into the UK.
- The £18,600 can be made up with savings, with the formula that £16,000 plus (2.5 * the difference between earnings and 18600) is required. In other words, somebody who may have been earning £40,000 but just lost their job, would require £62,500 in savings to bring their partner into the UK.
- The amount required increases rapidly with children who are not British citizens. An income of £22,400 is required for the first non-British child, with an additional £2400 for each subsequent non-British child.
- The amount required takes no account of different regions (i.e. an £18,600 salary in central London is very different from an £18,600 salary in Tyneside, in terms of cost of living and average incomes).
- The income is for the UK partner ONLY, so if for example the overseas partner is the main earner, in many cases it makes it impossible for expat Brits to return to the UK. An example may be a British woman in Japan who is a housewife, with a middle-class husband. That family would now face exile under the new rules. We are seeing many cases of British citizens effectively consigned to exile overseas.

Elderly Dependants
It is basically impossible for anyone, no matter how much they earn, to bring a parent into the UK. According to one of our sources, as of 5th January 2013 only one dependant relative visa has been granted worldwide since the rule changes in July.

Language
Additionally, the language requirement for settlement will be made much more difficult from autumn of 2013 (jumping from CEFR A1 - entry level - to B1 - intermediate level). This is a more specialised area so will be discussed in a later post, but it is also likely to exclude a lot of people.

It is worth noting that this language level must be reached in addition to passing the much-criticised 'Life in the UK test'. If you want to know why the 'Life in the UK test' is much-criticised - see if you can pass it.

Time to ILR
Furthermore, the period before non-EU migrants on family visas can apply for indefinite leave to remain in the UK increases from 2 years to 5 years. This greatly increases insecurity for those on the family migration path, and will make it more difficult for partners and other family migrants to find employment as many employers will find it difficult to maintain the overhead to check migration status.

The Migrants Rights Network have summarised the rules here : http://www.migrantsrights.org.uk/blog/2012/06/family-migration-new-rules-announced .

A very useful and concise research briefing on changes to the rules is here: http://www.parliament.uk/briefing-papers/SN06353 (via http://familyimmigrationalliance.wordpress.com/2012/12/19/a-positive-signal/ ).

There are some examples of the type of person who would fall foul of the new rules :-
- British women who cannot move overseas to be with their foreign partner because UK family law prevents them from taking their family overseas; yet these new immigration laws prevent their partner from joining them in the UK. These women face a choice of being with their children, or being with their partner.

- British citizens working overseas earning far higher than the equivalent of £18,600 are now faced with a choice of never returning to the UK or a minimum of 6-12 month family breakup.
Bear in mind that UKBA processing times are now through the roof - the poor performance of UKBA in implementing its own rules has been covered at length in the media and in Parliament. The performance of UKBA is a slightly separate issue from the rules themselve, but it adds to their onerous implmentation.
Additionally, some countries do not allow the British spouse to work legally (an example is Indonesia). Families in this situation are kept in a draconian trap by both nations - one partner cannot work overseas, and the new rules mean the family cannot return to the UK.

- British citizens who fall in love with people from countries with similarly regressive laws, and who are therefore prevented because of an arbitrary income requirement, from living in either of their home countries!

- British citizens whose partner or parents live in a country where homosexuality is punishable by death!

- British citizens who are higher rate tax payers and would qualify under these rules to bring in a non EU spouse and 20 of their non EU children, are prevented from bringing in an elderly parent living alone on the other side of the world! If the rules show that a certain amount of money is enough for over 20 people, why isn’t this amount enough for ONE parent?

- British parents, whose children are forced out of the UK, are left with no one to look after them. We know of an elderly British couple whose adult children (both British, both affected by these rules) who are now facing a life without having their children to help them in their old age. Is the state committed to caring for this couple to the same level as their children would?

- British citizens in love with people from countries which the Foreign Office advises against travel to e.g.Iraq. If it’s not safe for a British citizen to travel to, is it really safe for them to move their entire families to?

- British citizens, living outside London – who while not meeting this random income criterion, earn a sufficient amount to have an above average quality of life, do not qualify for benefits, yet are not allowed by this government to live with their loved ones. This highlights that a single income criterion overlooks different income and expenditure levels across the country.

- Some British soldiers earn as little as £14k. These young Brits are given the responsibility to defend our shores and our people, yet are not given basic rights. Their right to a family life is being threatened when every day they are defending our way of life.

- British students and ex-students who have fallen in love and wish to marry their non EU former classmates. In a world where we are increasingly seeing the benefits of multiculturalism, how can we let this government dictate who we can and cannot fall in love with?

- International students who do their British education proud by being employed in top UK firms and government departments as higher rate taxpayers – who have contributed heavily to make this country better and now after nearly 20 years of being British and having made their life here, are being pushed out of the country by virtue of being told that they cannot maintain their life in the UK and yet fulfil their duty to their parents.


Who Is Affected?

So what does this mean? Families are being broken up, couples are being torn apart, a generation of children are being brought up by single parents.

According to Oxford University's Migration Observatory (source: http://www.migrationobservatory.ox.ac.uk/press-releases/women-young-people-and-non-londoners-are-most-affected-changes-family-migration-polic ), these changes will mean that, of British taxpayers (and voters) in employment :

- 47% will not qualify to bring in a family member.
- 61% of women will not qualify to bring in a family member (showing the sexist nature of these rules).
- 51% of people in Wales will not qualify to bring in a family member.
- 48% of people in Scotland will not qualify to bring in a family member.
- 46% of English residents will not qualify to bring in a family member.
- 29% of Londoners will not qualify to bring in a family member.

According to research by another academic contact we have been in touch with, the way the rules are implemented means that the figures may be even higher. For example, we have heard cases of bad advice being given out by UKBA; of people being refused by overseas stations even when they MEET the rules.

It is shocking how badly thought through these new rules are and there are already cases of people falling foul of the rules, families and couples being broken up, children being forced to be without one parent....

According to the think tank, MIPEX, Britain has the most difficult to overcome spouse, partner, child and family immigration rules in Europe after Norway (source). But given that average income levels in Norway are far higher than in the UK (as of January 2013), and given the more equitable nature of Norwegian society, this suggests that Britain is easily the most difficult to enter country of immigration in Europe for spouses, partners, children and families.

Read On...

I urge you to look at the following and judge for yourself. These stories show the diversity of people affected by the rules. SOMEONE you know will probably be affected :

“As British citizens we have fewer rights in Britain than our EU friends and their non-EU partners… ” (Migrants Rights Scotland)

'Sons and lovers'. (The Economist)

'Milton mum fights deportation' (This Is Staffordshire)

'Graduate forced out of UK for not earning enough' (Herald Scotland)

'Deport my heart' (Max Dunbar)

'An open letter to Theresa May' (Kraion Blog)

'How immigration laws are splitting families apart' (BBC)

'New immigration rules accused ot splitting up families' (Independent)

'Newlyweds spend first year on opposite sides of Atlantic' (Daily Record)

'Uncertain future for family' (Fenland Citizen)

'GMB: GMB calls for urgent review as changes to immigration laws cause confusion and harm families' (Politics Home / GMB)

'Cruelty and cowardice replace common sense' (Amol Rajan, The Independent)

'Why my husband's lack of English is keeping us apart' (BBC)

David Ward calls for rethink on earnings link' (Bradford Telegraph and Argus)

'Exile or family breakup' (Bringing up Brits)

'The rules of love' (British Future)

'Theresa May's immigration plan is a one-size-fits-none fix' (Brooke Magnanti, The Guardian)

'£18,600 wage minimum to bring spouse to UK' (Channel 4)

'FactCheck: Minister wrong on immigration' (Channel 4)

'Immigration rules will stop 30,000 relatives moving to UK' (Channel 4)

'New family rules vs. integration' (COMPAS Oxford Blog)

'The nasty party just got even nastier' (Crooked Timber)

'Is EU love really worth more than Asian love?' (Adrian Hilton, Daily Mail)

'Why Indians in UK worry over new family immigration rule' (Economic Times, India)

'Conservative Party member terms Britain's new immigration policy 'racist'' (Economic Times, India)

'UK government’s tightening of Immigration laws clear violation of basic human rights' (Outernationalist)

'Don’t make £18,600 annually? You can’t sponsor your non-EU spouse in UK' (Firstpost, India)

'A case of tough love' (Freemovement Blog)

'More new immigration rules with immediate effect' (Freemovement Blog)

'Poor people to be prevented from marrying' (Freemovement Blog)

'Stark choice under new immigration rules: exile or family breakup' (The Guardian)

'Out of sight, out of mind: the heartlessness of the Home Secretary' (Michael Allen, Huffington Post)

'Immigration clampdown announced – if you want to marry a foreigner and live in the UK together you must earn £18,600' (Immigration Matters)

'The UK: Rich immigrants only please' (Infernal Machine)

'Theresa May and punitive populism' (Institute of Race Relations)

'United by love, divided by Theresa May' (Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants)

'Families torn apart by UK immigration laws' (Kings Court Chambers)

'Young and in love - but unable to settle' (Left Foot Forward)

'Why aren’t Liberal Democrats complaining loudly about draconian new family immigration rules?' (Lib Dem Voice)

'Government's new plans to limit immigration are more worrying than you thing' (Liberal Conspiracy)

'Love knows no borders: changes to immigration rules will separate families' (Migrant Forum)

'Women, young people and non-Londoners are most affected by changes to family migration policy' (Migration Observatory)

'Can't buy me love' (MIPEX)

'Keeping families apart: the impact of a new income threshold for family migration' (Migrant Rights Network)

'Migrants earning rule 'repugnant' ' (MSN)

'A breaking rule: partners under pressure' (Hsiao-Hung Pai, Open Democracy)

'The LGBT fallout of UK immigration' (Reflexive Action)

'Immigrants don't come here for the weather - they want to work' (Shazia Mirza, The Guardian)

'Half of population could be barred from bringing in a foreign partner under family visa reform' (Daily Telegraph)

'Chelmsford mum fights to get son's dad UK visa' (This Is Essex)

'Couple fight new immigration laws in bid to stay together' (This Is Somerset)

'Welsh dad barred from bringing Mexican wife and son to Wales by 'unfair' income rule' (Wales Online)

'UK to impose family curbs on immigrants' (Times of India)

Maybe more heartbreakingly, the YouTube video 'Skype Mummy' addresses the plight of one family broken up by these appalling rules : Skype Mummy

32 comments:

  1. Thank you all so much for the work you do!! Would love to share our story with you someday. We had planned on moving back to the UK to raise our family there and as a base for our businesses, until at immigration in Inverness I was updated on the changes to the spousal visa. Now we are back in Thailand ( where we had lived before our journey to Scotland) and in total limbo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello, thanks for sharing your story and good luck! Please do keep following and also keep joining the relevant Facebook and other support groups that we publicise from time to time to keep abreast of the campaign. In particular jcwi.org.uk and migrantsrights.org.uk. All the best to you and merry Christmas.

      Delete
  2. I think some of your information may be incorrect. If the children and British (by descent or otherwise) then they are not included in the financial requirement, just the spouse. Correct? You should probably outline this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If the children are British citizens, then you are correct (generally the additional requirements are for stepchildren). I'll reword it slightly to make it clearer. Thanks for pointing it out.

      Delete
  3. Me and my fiancee, who by the way is a British citizen, are currently living in South Africa, my home country. We would love to move back to the UK, where I have worked before, but with the new income threshold of £18 600 and the very bad Rand to £ exchange rate, it seems almost impossible for us to do so.

    ReplyDelete
  4. been with my husband 5 yrs married 2 we applied for a spouse visa in 2012 to be put on hold we have took our visa off hold and asked for my husbands passport back 28th may2014 we are still waiting for this now 1 month on ( we applied on tunis) why do we have to wait we paid for the visa and they will keep this money all we want is passport back and wedding photos and all paper work. we have e mailed and phoned but nothing can anyone help xxxxx

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  5. Barbara Suzuki4 July 2014 at 10:58

    Good cause.
    http://hnhnorfolk.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/the-forgotten-would-be-immigrants.html

    ReplyDelete
  6. I get 28.500 a year and girlfriend and baby boy are living in Thailand as she cannot go back her country (laos) as she as a baby with a unmarried man. She as to pass a English test before she comes here but were does she get the time study with a 1 year baby who as a British passport.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Theresa May introduced these new rules to give the illusion that the government is reducing immigration, but really they are just using easy targets. I did not know that there was a price on falling inlove...

    My engagement broke down because of these precise rules, as I committed the crime of falling inlove with someone from another country. It would have been hard for me live in his country as my profession is basically useless there, and I do not speak the language. We hoped to live in my country, but the salary requirement has prevented that. I have tried to get a higher paid job to support us, but the job market is hard for everyone at the moment. After almost a year of waiting and months apart, it exhausted us emotionally and I realised it just wasn't fair on either of us anymore.

    These rules actually make it easier for sham marriages and male order brides, and makes a hellish time for genuine applicants.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hello what support groups do you have on FB. Also is there anyone that has gotten a job offer and gone that route. I am in the US and am in the process of working up the funds to go through a lawyer to the UK. Have many had more joy that way???

    Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is the most popular Facebook group - 'I Love My Foreign Spouse' : https://www.facebook.com/groups/139807999382936/

      You would do well to sign up there as it might be good to talk to people who have gone through this recently.

      Delete
  9. I'm afraid that it is not just people earning under the minimum threshold (£18,600) that are being affected. I earn over £35,000 with savings, own a home and have a good job. However, my wife's visa was rejected by the British High Commission in India for the most spurious reason.

    We have now been apart for over one year and the appeal process could drag on for many more months. It is heartbreaking. I wanted to start a business and family in my home country of the UK but am being put in the position of having to consider emigrating so that we can be together. I am so ashamed of this misguided policy and my own country's government!

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm afraid that it is not just people earning under the minimum threshold (£18,600) that are being affected. I earn over £35,000 with savings, own a home and have a good job. However, my wife's visa was rejected by the British High Commission in India for the most spurious reason.

    We have now been apart for over one year and the appeal process could drag on for many more months. It is heartbreaking. I wanted to start a business and family in my home country of the UK but am being put in the position of having to consider emigrating so that we can be together. I am so ashamed of this misguided policy and my own country's government!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi William

      I find that them refusing your wife's visa to be refused to be strange especially that you have all the required criteria. I mean my story is that I have had this battle with immigration for nearly five years but before I didn't have the relevant criteria. Now that I do I a little apprehensive about applying.

      Delete
    2. Please don't let my case put you off. However, my advice would be to get a good immigration lawyer to help put together your application and evidence documentation. You need to be really thorough and not give them any excuse for a refusal. However, sometimes the entry clearance officer just makes a poor decision as with my wife's application. Best of luck.

      Delete
  11. I am a 59 year old teacher living in Pakistan with my Pakistani wife. The state has outlawed marriages to foreign males (not the other way round). We have been married for 25 years and I am a British Citizen. My income level is well below £18,600 per year as the exchange rate is 158 rupees to the pound sterling. We have hardly any savings. Enough in fact for just two air fares. I earn £850 a month. Even the Surinder Singh route is too expensive and next year I will have to work on less pay and a yearly contract due to my age.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I keep reading that this and that is being judged in court but what is changing ANYTHING
    Criminals flout the law, but the rest of us follow rules laid down.
    BUT enough is enough remove laws that go against basic human rights to be together with loved ones.

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  13. I am a 27 year old British man married to an American, we desperately want to move home to the UK as the cost of living where we are is just unbelievable, not to mention the fact that we are expecting our first child and my father has multiple sclerosis and can't travel here ever. Under these criminal laws we are stuck here. I served in the British army previously and feel disgusted to be British given it is my country that does this to its own and other people.

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  14. Please sign this petition and let's bring this issue in front of the commons for debate. I'm in a similar position to you all, raising my baby alone as a forced single parent while my partner was refused entry to see our baby born. Every single day is a struggle just to get by with the feelings of loss and hopelessness.

    Reconsider the 2012 immigration rules for spouse visas.

    Why is this important?

    Following a change in immigration rules in 2012, a valid, genuine, and even long-standing marriage to a British citizen is no longer considered grounds to allow families to live together in the UK. Nor is having children who are British citizens.

    Reconsider this discriminatory law which keeps families apart.

    Allow the same rights for British citizens as the government recognises for European citizens, who can live in the UK with non-EU spouses. Citizens of all of the EU countries, as well as Switzerland, can live and work in the UK with a spouse and/or children from anywhere in the world. This right is denied by the UK to its own citizens.

    It is time for the Home Office to rethink this law, and allow the families of British citizens to live together.

    Sign and share

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/121216

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/121216


    ReplyDelete
  15. Please sign this petition and let's bring this issue in front of the commons for debate. I'm in a similar position to you all, raising my baby alone as a forced single parent while my partner was refused entry to see our baby born. Every single day is a struggle just to get by with the feelings of loss and hopelessness.

    Reconsider the 2012 immigration rules for spouse visas.

    Why is this important?

    Following a change in immigration rules in 2012, a valid, genuine, and even long-standing marriage to a British citizen is no longer considered grounds to allow families to live together in the UK. Nor is having children who are British citizens.

    Reconsider this discriminatory law which keeps families apart.

    Allow the same rights for British citizens as the government recognises for European citizens, who can live in the UK with non-EU spouses. Citizens of all of the EU countries, as well as Switzerland, can live and work in the UK with a spouse and/or children from anywhere in the world. This right is denied by the UK to its own citizens.

    It is time for the Home Office to rethink this law, and allow the families of British citizens to live together.

    Sign and share

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/121216

    https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/121216


    ReplyDelete
  16. hi everyone
    I'm an Albanian girl married with a British husband. Being six months away from each other and being denied the really expensive visa and stuff we suffer in distance...I've been refused the visa on the excuse we aren't genuine couple for gods sake but no one checked nor interviewed us and they had many many proofs of the opposite. Plus I lived in the uk for three years illegally and when met my husband we spend a year together then decided to come in Albania to get married as we had no right to do so there. After we left together with our own will and I wasn't deported nor in any trouble,they said I didn't show remorse about being illegal in my application. Wasn't remorse enough the fact that I left to make things right?! Now we haven't got the right to be together even if we are ok in our requirements?!? God...I see there are so many people like us...how can our voices be heard guys?!? Why another Europe citizen has every right in the uk but not the English people themselves?!? This is absurd:( please help us....
    Regards ,Alice xo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess no suggestions whatsoever...(?)

      Delete
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  18. Hello Everyone,
    My name is Brian, US Citizen, I am married to my husband Ben, British Citizen, of 2 years. We were married in the US, in one of the states that allowed same sex marriage. But at the time we lived in NC where our Marriage was not recognized on the federal level until late 2014. Well, because of this my husband over stayed his visa in the USA and is not bared. All because we were not recognized as a married couple, I had no legal standing to petition for his visa. Well Ben's Mother fell ill and we sort of dropped everything and Moved to the UK. We decided to no pursue the US visa after it became legal because we thought, that Same Sex Marriages are legal in the UK and we would have a much easier time in the UK.....BOY WERE WE WRONG. We also thought that there would be a lot less bigotry and discrimination in the UK and it would be a better to raise a family. We went about doing everything the legal way, hiring a solicitor and long story short and 1000's of pounds later......we are now on our Second Appeal. They will not let me stay, even though my Husband has a good job and makes well over the financial threshold and I am an Architectural Assistant(not yet working, because i want to stay legal and do the right thing). Both working professionals and higher tax payers they will not let me stay. Still that does not matter. We even tried to appeal to them on compassionate grounds because my Mother in law has now been told her disease is terminal. But again....the Home Office Does not care! We are no awaiting the judgment from the next hearing on what our fate is going to be. We have one more appeal after that. We are now desperate on what to do next. The stress is unbearable, not knowing where you might be living in the future. We would like to start a family here in the UK but we can't, our lives are in limbo. We are lucky enough to still be together but we are not sure how long that will last because if the Home Office decides its time for me to go. I will have to go and my husband can't come back to the states with me because he over stayed his visa. That will have to all be sorted out first which is 1000's more to fix. I'm sure we can explain what happened but it will cost 1000's to do so!!! When will this madness end!!!!!!!!!!! ANY ADVICE OR HELP is greatly appreciated.
    Regards, Brian

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Brian - what an awful story.

      We obviously can't give advice through the comments section of a blog, but there are a number of Facebook support groups which you might find useful. I Love My Foreign Spouse is good : https://www.facebook.com/groups/139807999382936/ . This might be worth joining.

      Delete
  19. Thank you Steven,
    My apologies, I just read where no advice is given. :) I guess I should have said support! Its nice, well not nice but it makes me feel better knowing that we are not in this alone. We are at our wits end. its just so frustrating!
    Thank you...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No need to apologise. :) Just pointing you in the direction of a community that might be helpful...

      Delete
    2. Thanks, I just joined that group! Thanks for the support!!!!

      Delete
  20. I am appalled by this 18600 minimum.i have 2 children and have worked from the age of 15 onwards and qualified to be a teacher. I could easily earn this amount but got pregnant with my second child. Now I have 2 children and no husband as I cannot work due to my youngest being 4 months old. I don't have any help and I can't earn this amount for a good few years. In that time my husband will miss out on the most precious years of our kids lives. Im at a loss and just feel like there's no light at the end of the tunnel.my husband could easily support our family, but his job doesn't count. It seems you should only dream of living in the UK if you are financially well off!

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  22. Maybe this can be a light in the dark tunnel for the couples from the Uk, ,Australia, Canada and Nz
    https://www.change.org/p/parliament-of-the-united-kingdom-parliament-of-australia-parliament-of-canada-parliament-of-new-zealand-advocate-and-introduce-legislation-promoting-the-free-movement-of-citizens-between-the-uk-canada-australia-and-new-zealand

    ReplyDelete